“Europe and Anti-Semitism: Are we at a civilisational crisis point?” – Panel discussion – Thursday 19 February

HJS event 19 Feb juif copy

 

Across Europe, it seems that the oldest hatred of Anti-Semitism is once again rearing its ugly head. With attacks against Jews on the increase across the continent, sometimes related to Israel and sometimes not, it is unsurprising that whole Jewish communities have begun to look nervously at exit signs. This has been particularly marked in France – where 1% of the community left last year following a spate of incidents, with more expected to follow in the wake of the Hypercacher hostage crisis in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attacks. Nor has Britain been immune from the problem, with the summer of 2014 seeing a surge of Anti-Semitic incidents that has left Jewish citizens feeling extremely uncomfortable.

Of course, this is not just an issue for Jews – as France’s Prime Minister recently stated: “If 100000 Jews leave, France will no longer be France.” The return of largescale Anti-Semitism therefore threatens not just Jewish futures, but also those of all Europeans.

So is there a safe Jewish future in Europe? And more generally, what does the upsurge in Anti-Semitism mean for European society?

Join our high-profile panel to hear their thoughts and to pose your questions for them to answer.

Thursday 19th February 2015

6:45 pm

Venue: Central Synagogue, 36-40 Hallam Street, London W1W 6NW

Book by phone: 020 7580 1355 or email: bookings@centralsynagogue.org.uk or online.

Comment on this article

Latest from the blog

Family-zone-Sundaysfeat Family Zone – Sunday Morning Jewish Activities for Under 5s

Spend Sunday mornings doing something Jewish with your children/grandchildren that is productive, imaginative, educational, interactive and fun. Sessions include davening, learning alef bet, Jewish festivals & traditions and…

Photograph of Barry Marcus - Rabbi VideoRabbi Marcus MBE Tazria – Metzorah

Tazria continues with the themes of holiness and purity and in particular with the affliction known as Tzara’at. Tzara’at is often incorrectly translated as leprosy but it is…

Read more from the blog